Polish Painter Jan Komski – Looking for scraps

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Looking for Scraps

Polish Painter Jan Komski - Looking for scraps

Polish painter Jan Komski’s painting; Food line in the main camp (Auschwitz I).


Administrative Punishment

Administrative Punishment – a painting by Jan Komski

When something unauthorized was found on a prisoner, like an extra piece of bread, he was subjected to this punishment. Polish painter Jan Komski himself hung like this an hour a day for three consecutive days, because he brought food and medicine back to the camp after a day at work.

Administrative Punishment – a painting by Jan Komski

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All art in this exhibit is copyright © Auschwitz Museum – Jan Komski. All rights reserved.

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Escapees from Auschwitz

“On April 7, 1944, two Slovakian Jews, twenty-six-year-old Alfred Weczler and twenty-year-old Rudolf Vrba, escaped from Auschwitz. They provided the first eyewitness account of the concentration and extermination camp to the western world, an account that set off the chain of events that led to the Nuremberg trial.

The Alfred Weczler – Rudolf Vrba Report

“On April 7, 1944, two Slovakian Jews, twenty-six-year-old Alfred Weczler and twenty-year-old Rudolf Vrba, escaped from Auschwitz.

They provided the first eyewitness account of the concentration and extermination camp to the western world, an account that set off the chain of events that led to the Nuremberg trial. …

Escape from Auschwitz was made difficult not only by the physical barriers, but by the negative attitude of the general camp population, which suffered after every escape.

If an escapee somehow made his way beyond the two electrified barbed-wire fences and watchtowers, blaring sirens alerted the whole countryside.

Dogs were put into pursuit, and SS and military personnel began to comb the fields and woods. With his shorn head and prison uniform, an inmate could expect no help from the local populace, for assisting an escapee meant death.